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Career Prospects

The playing field of an aerospace and aviation engineer has many names; aerodynamics, propulsion, navigation, flight testing. An aerospace and aviation engineer designs, analyses, models and tests aircraft, spacecraft, satellites and anything that flies through the air, such as a rocket. You will likely find him or her designing the latest aircraft or building advanced engines and avionics systems.

Singapore is the largest aerospace maintenance repair and overhaul hub in the region, having successfully attracted significant fixed asset investments and providing many employment opportunities. SPRING Singapore has led a series of testing and certification initiatives to boost the growth of sectors, including aerospace. The government has set a target for the aerospace industry to achieve an output exceeding S$12 billion by 2018.

Changi Airport is one of the busiest airports in the world, serving more than 100 airlines operating 6,100 flights weekly that connect Singapore to 220 cities in about 60 countries and territories. In 2015, 55.4 million passengers passed through the airport. By 2017 when Terminal 4 becomes fully operational it will handle up to 70 million passengers annually. In addition to being an important passenger hub, Changi Airport is also one of the busiest air cargo-hub in the world.

Boosted by strong government support, Singapore’s aviation sector will required highly skilled professionals to operate and manage existing and upcoming aviation services and facilities.

An artificial heart, a prosthetic leg, magnetic resonance imaging X-rays, biomedical engineers combine the knowledge of engineering and biological sciences to advance medical technology in order to create these medical devices or processes to eradicate a health problem, advance medical care or to satisfy a human desire.

Chemical engineers apply principles from chemistry, physics, mathematics to transform materials and chemicals into more valuable forms. These products include ultra-strong fibres and fabrics, organic dye sensitized photovoltaic cells, adhesives and composites for aircraft and vehicles, bio-compatible materials for implants and prosthetics, gels for medical applications, pharmaceuticals, and films with special dielectric, optical or spectroscopic properties for opto-electronic devices.

Materials engineers develop, process, and test materials used to create a wide range of products, from computer chips and aircraft wings to golf clubs and biomedical devices. They study the properties and structures of metals, ceramics, plastics, composites, nanomaterials, and other substances to create new materials that meet certain mechanical, electrical, and chemical requirements.

With Singapore’s goal of being a Biopolis hub, leading biomedical and pharmaceutical companies are leveraging on Singapore as operational headquarters putting in huge investment in manufacturing with some setting up R&D centres. Interesting and challenging careers in designing and developing both biomedical products and processes are available to engineers in this sector.

As one of the world’s leading energy and chemical hubs, Singapore’s contribution to the industry is vast, both in terms of output and research. With Jurong Island as the main thrust, Singapore has developed itself to be among the world’s top petrochemical hubs and has attracted most of the world leading companies to set up plants here. Most companies are also moving up the value chain by setting up R&D centres to develop advanced materials and specialty chemicals. Ample opportunities await engineers to innovate in this sector and to move on into management.

Engineers in this field are adept builders and skilful surveyors who give us Parthenon in Ancient Greece, Great Wall of China that stood the test of time, the famous Golden Gate Bridge and many dams, roads, harbours and commercial buildings of our modern days. They deal with the planning, construction and maintenance of fixed structures or public works to improve the quality of our lives.

In Singapore, with buildings such as Marina Bay Sands becoming more complex and construction works such as Gardens by the Bay more unique, this sector offers challenging and rewarding careers for those who dream of shaping the landscape of Singapore and beyond.

This engineering discipline now has a new twist. With intelligent and complex buildings, such as the Integrated Resorts and Singapore Flyer mushrooming in Singapore and around the world, engineers in this sector can venture in facility management. This area is defined by the International Facility Management Association (IFMA), as “a profession that encompasses multiple disciplines to ensure functionality of the built environment by integrating people, place, processes and technology.”

Engineers in this sector play pivotal roles in making sure that all aspects of such facilities, from its ventilation, lifts, escalators, sensors, auto thermostats to the entertainment rides that run through these resorts, work as an efficient and integrated whole to bring about comfort and pleasure to people living, working and playing in these buildings and facilities.

For more information on engineering careers in the building sector, please check out the BCA’s Building Careers Portal.

Computer, media and infocomm technology lies at the core of today’s digital age. Imagine… would you be able to work, play and communicate without the Internet, mobile phone and the software applications that we are so used to now? Think Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, iPad, iPhone, Galaxy Note or Internet TV? Yes, infocomm and media technologies have become a major part of our life today. Imagine what kind of success awaits those who are able to play a part in creating the technologies that drive the entire world!

As an infocomm technology and media professional you will design creative and media-rich applications, manage infocomm services, connect the world with communications and networking platforms, and discover new applications for the Internet.

Over the last several years, Singapore’s infocomm sector has been thriving with revenue hitting S$189.6 billion in 2015, a 13.5 percent increase from 2014, according to IDA Singapore.

Electrical and electronics engineers design, develop and test electrical systems and electronic devices. The fundamentals to this exciting and varied discipline are the sciences of physics and mathematics, which render both qualitative and quantitative descriptions of how systems work. Engineers in this field apply the laws of physics governing electricity, magnetism and light to develop products and services for the benefit of mankind.

Electrical and electronics engineers are found everywhere, from consulting firms, test laboratories, design companies, infrastructure services to wafer fabrication and manufacturing plants. They work with scientists, computer programmers and other professionals to design and build gadgets and applications that meet our daily needs.

The building sector is also one of many industries that needs electrical and electronics engineers. For more information on engineering careers in the building sector, please check out the BCA’s Building Careers Portal.

The world is facing enormous challenges in the coming decades. As its population grows, there is an increasing need to ensure that we continue to enjoy an improving quality of life, yet making it sustainable for generations to come. Resources like potable water and fossil fuel are becoming scarce. New security threats from cyberspace and terrorists add to the challenges ahead.

A new breed of engineers with inquisitive mind to understand, explore, and solve complex issues will rise to solve these challenges. They are equipped with a strong foundation in core engineering disciplines, like electronic, electrical and mechanical engineering, as well as in the fields of management and social sciences, to create sustainable solutions. At the same time, they are also trained to adopt a global mindset and to apply interdisciplinary expertise like critical thinking and communication skills.

With Singapore government’s drives and initiatives in R&D and a knowledge-based economy, they are well prepared for a wide range of careers in engineering fields, including aerospace, computer science/engineering, electrical/electronic engineering, energy, health care, logistics, manufacturing, material science, mechanical engineering, nanotechnology, telecommunication and transportation.

The fast-changing industry landscape demands a new breed of engineers equipped with strong technical and business know-how. This requires engineers who are market-savvy with a keen sense of business development and the ability to drive and execute interdisciplinary projects encompassing both engineering competence and business knowledge.

A new generation of engineers who are trained in both engineering and business will excel in marketing, sales, project management, operations management and business development.

Logistics engineering focuses on the complex design of the flow of goods. Logistics engineers are in charge of designing and analysing the systems employed in the distribution of goods and services. They evaluate all aspects of distribution methods with the ultimate goal of improving efficiency.

Because logistics engineers are concerned with the entire supply chain, their job involves a wide variety of tasks. Logistics engineers handle inventory, process orders, plan warehouse layouts and help design product packaging to maximise shipping efficiency.

The scope of environmental engineering is varied and includes environmental impact assessment and mitigation, water supply and treatment, waste water conveyance and treatment, as well as air quality management. In clean energy engineering, the objective is to use renewable energy as an alternative to fossil fuels. Energy efficient technologies are also at the forefront in helping industries to cut down on energy consumption.

Today, increasing human population and rapid urbanisation are posing severe challenges to the environment and putting a strain on our fast-depleting energy resources. Environmental and energy engineers respond to these concerns by developing technically sound solutions to improve environmental quality and optimise the utilisation of resources so as to bring about a safer and more sustainable future.

By integrating mathematics, engineering science and technology, environmental and energy engineers adopt multi-disciplinary approaches to meet these challenges. They have opportunities to work with computers, conduct laboratory studies, do field sampling and evaluate and develop alternative fuel options that include solar power, fuel cell technology, wind energy and biomass energy.

For more information on engineering careers in the building sector, please check out the BCA’s Building Careers Portal.

Do you know that Singapore is the world’s leader in offshore oil-rig construction and vessel conversion?

The naval architects and offshore engineers have detailed technical knowledge of marine and offshore design and construction that requires integration of fundamental mechanical, electrical and electronic engineering principles. They also design, build and operate offshore platforms, rigs and pipelines for the offshore oil and gas sector.

The marine engineers operate the shipboard systems while the vessel is at sea, making sure engines, instruments and systems work safely and efficiently on ships and submarines.

The marine and offshore engineering industry in Singapore is world-class with an international clientele. Singapore is the world leader in the conversion of Floating Production, Storage and Offloading (FPSO) and building of jack-up oilrigs (70 percent market share).

Singapore is also a major builder of semi-submersible drilling rigs, especially for operations in deep water and harsh environment. In addition, Singapore is one of the world’s premier ship repair centres and a niche player for the building of customised and specialised vessels.

Singapore also rates amongst the top three global centres for oil and gas equipment manufacturing and servicing.

Turning energy into motion to carry out specific work efficiently, that’s the major emphasis of mechanical engineers. Using principles such as heat, forces and the conservation of mass and energy they analyse physical systems and design most of the things we use in the automobiles, aircraft, heating and cooling systems and household appliances.

Versatility is the key word for mechanical engineering and you will find mechanical engineers on the move from the office to the manufacturing plant or outdoor sites, assessing new products and innovations, building prototypes, turning research ideas into technical plans and using computer aided design and modelling software, improving on production processes and planning and supervising the installation of machinery.

With their diverse training and experience, mechanical engineers are found in almost every sector of the industry from the aerospace industry to the mega production plants and from designing miniature body parts to complex oil rigs. This diversity provides the breadth for mechanical engineers to move into technical management, project management and other management positions.

Smart devices, intelligent machines and hybrid systems – these are created by integrating mechanical, electrical and computer engineering. Exploiting these disciplines together, mechatronics engineers can make devices, machines and complex systems intelligent and automated to interact with sensors, and to manipulate and control electric motors, servo-mechanisms and other electrical systems.

Industrial automation whether using robots or customised factory systems is a typical example of mechatronics. With our industry moving up the value chain, automation is constantly evolving to operate faster, more efficiently by incorporating the latest technologies.

Robotics engineers are involved in integrating science and technology to design and develop robots, which could be a consumer device such an automated vacuum cleaner to a complex production line employing multiple robots in an assembly plant. Such a device or system can be made intelligent allowing it to sense the environment, make decisions and manoeuvre itself based on a set of data in its computerised memory.

For more information on engineering careers in the building sector, please check out the BCA’s Building Careers Portal.

The playing field of an aerospace and aviation engineer has many names; aerodynamics, propulsion, navigation, flight testing. An aerospace and aviation engineer designs, analyses, models and tests aircraft, spacecraft, satellites and anything that flies through the air, such as a rocket. You will likely find him or her designing the latest aircraft or building advanced engines and avionics systems.

Singapore is the largest aerospace maintenance repair and overhaul hub in the region, having successfully attracted significant fixed asset investments and providing many employment opportunities. SPRING Singapore has led a series of testing and certification initiatives to boost the growth of sectors, including aerospace. The government has set a target for the aerospace industry to achieve an output exceeding S$12 billion by 2018.

Changi Airport is one of the busiest airports in the world, serving more than 100 airlines operating 6,100 flights weekly that connect Singapore to 220 cities in about 60 countries and territories. In 2015, 55.4 million passengers passed through the airport. By 2017 when Terminal 4 becomes fully operational it will handle up to 70 million passengers annually. In addition to being an important passenger hub, Changi Airport is also one of the busiest air cargo-hub in the world.

Boosted by strong government support, Singapore’s aviation sector will required highly skilled professionals to operate and manage existing and upcoming aviation services and facilities.

An artificial heart, a prosthetic leg, magnetic resonance imaging X-rays, biomedical engineers combine the knowledge of engineering and biological sciences to advance medical technology in order to create these medical devices or processes to eradicate a health problem, advance medical care or to satisfy a human desire.

Chemical engineers apply principles from chemistry, physics, mathematics to transform materials and chemicals into more valuable forms. These products include ultra-strong fibres and fabrics, organic dye sensitized photovoltaic cells, adhesives and composites for aircraft and vehicles, bio-compatible materials for implants and prosthetics, gels for medical applications, pharmaceuticals, and films with special dielectric, optical or spectroscopic properties for opto-electronic devices.

Materials engineers develop, process, and test materials used to create a wide range of products, from computer chips and aircraft wings to golf clubs and biomedical devices. They study the properties and structures of metals, ceramics, plastics, composites, nanomaterials, and other substances to create new materials that meet certain mechanical, electrical, and chemical requirements.

With Singapore’s goal of being a Biopolis hub, leading biomedical and pharmaceutical companies are leveraging on Singapore as operational headquarters putting in huge investment in manufacturing with some setting up R&D centres. Interesting and challenging careers in designing and developing both biomedical products and processes are available to engineers in this sector.

As one of the world’s leading energy and chemical hubs, Singapore’s contribution to the industry is vast, both in terms of output and research. With Jurong Island as the main thrust, Singapore has developed itself to be among the world’s top petrochemical hubs and has attracted most of the world leading companies to set up plants here. Most companies are also moving up the value chain by setting up R&D centres to develop advanced materials and specialty chemicals. Ample opportunities await engineers to innovate in this sector and to move on into management.

Engineers in this field are adept builders and skilful surveyors who give us Parthenon in Ancient Greece, Great Wall of China that stood the test of time, the famous Golden Gate Bridge and many dams, roads, harbours and commercial buildings of our modern days. They deal with the planning, construction and maintenance of fixed structures or public works to improve the quality of our lives.

In Singapore, with buildings such as Marina Bay Sands becoming more complex and construction works such as Gardens by the Bay more unique, this sector offers challenging and rewarding careers for those who dream of shaping the landscape of Singapore and beyond.

This engineering discipline now has a new twist. With intelligent and complex buildings, such as the Integrated Resorts and Singapore Flyer mushrooming in Singapore and around the world, engineers in this sector can venture in facility management. This area is defined by the International Facility Management Association (IFMA), as “a profession that encompasses multiple disciplines to ensure functionality of the built environment by integrating people, place, processes and technology.”

Engineers in this sector play pivotal roles in making sure that all aspects of such facilities, from its ventilation, lifts, escalators, sensors, auto thermostats to the entertainment rides that run through these resorts, work as an efficient and integrated whole to bring about comfort and pleasure to people living, working and playing in these buildings and facilities.

For more information on engineering careers in the building sector, please check out the BCA’s Building Careers Portal.

Computer, media and infocomm technology lies at the core of today’s digital age. Imagine… would you be able to work, play and communicate without the Internet, mobile phone and the software applications that we are so used to now? Think Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, iPad, iPhone, Galaxy Note or Internet TV? Yes, infocomm and media technologies have become a major part of our life today. Imagine what kind of success awaits those who are able to play a part in creating the technologies that drive the entire world!

As an infocomm technology and media professional you will design creative and media-rich applications, manage infocomm services, connect the world with communications and networking platforms, and discover new applications for the Internet.

Over the last several years, Singapore’s infocomm sector has been thriving with revenue hitting S$189.6 billion in 2015, a 13.5 percent increase from 2014, according to IDA Singapore.

Electrical and electronics engineers design, develop and test electrical systems and electronic devices. The fundamentals to this exciting and varied discipline are the sciences of physics and mathematics, which render both qualitative and quantitative descriptions of how systems work. Engineers in this field apply the laws of physics governing electricity, magnetism and light to develop products and services for the benefit of mankind.

Electrical and electronics engineers are found everywhere, from consulting firms, test laboratories, design companies, infrastructure services to wafer fabrication and manufacturing plants. They work with scientists, computer programmers and other professionals to design and build gadgets and applications that meet our daily needs.

The building sector is also one of many industries that needs electrical and electronics engineers. For more information on engineering careers in the building sector, please check out the BCA’s Building Careers Portal.

The world is facing enormous challenges in the coming decades. As its population grows, there is an increasing need to ensure that we continue to enjoy an improving quality of life, yet making it sustainable for generations to come. Resources like potable water and fossil fuel are becoming scarce. New security threats from cyberspace and terrorists add to the challenges ahead.

A new breed of engineers with inquisitive mind to understand, explore, and solve complex issues will rise to solve these challenges. They are equipped with a strong foundation in core engineering disciplines, like electronic, electrical and mechanical engineering, as well as in the fields of management and social sciences, to create sustainable solutions. At the same time, they are also trained to adopt a global mindset and to apply interdisciplinary expertise like critical thinking and communication skills.

With Singapore government’s drives and initiatives in R&D and a knowledge-based economy, they are well prepared for a wide range of careers in engineering fields, including aerospace, computer science/engineering, electrical/electronic engineering, energy, health care, logistics, manufacturing, material science, mechanical engineering, nanotechnology, telecommunication and transportation.

The fast-changing industry landscape demands a new breed of engineers equipped with strong technical and business know-how. This requires engineers who are market-savvy with a keen sense of business development and the ability to drive and execute interdisciplinary projects encompassing both engineering competence and business knowledge.

A new generation of engineers who are trained in both engineering and business will excel in marketing, sales, project management, operations management and business development.

Logistics engineering focuses on the complex design of the flow of goods. Logistics engineers are in charge of designing and analysing the systems employed in the distribution of goods and services. They evaluate all aspects of distribution methods with the ultimate goal of improving efficiency.

Because logistics engineers are concerned with the entire supply chain, their job involves a wide variety of tasks. Logistics engineers handle inventory, process orders, plan warehouse layouts and help design product packaging to maximise shipping efficiency.

The scope of environmental engineering is varied and includes environmental impact assessment and mitigation, water supply and treatment, waste water conveyance and treatment, as well as air quality management. In clean energy engineering, the objective is to use renewable energy as an alternative to fossil fuels. Energy efficient technologies are also at the forefront in helping industries to cut down on energy consumption.

Today, increasing human population and rapid urbanisation are posing severe challenges to the environment and putting a strain on our fast-depleting energy resources. Environmental and energy engineers respond to these concerns by developing technically sound solutions to improve environmental quality and optimise the utilisation of resources so as to bring about a safer and more sustainable future.

By integrating mathematics, engineering science and technology, environmental and energy engineers adopt multi-disciplinary approaches to meet these challenges. They have opportunities to work with computers, conduct laboratory studies, do field sampling and evaluate and develop alternative fuel options that include solar power, fuel cell technology, wind energy and biomass energy.

For more information on engineering careers in the building sector, please check out the BCA’s Building Careers Portal.

Do you know that Singapore is the world’s leader in offshore oil-rig construction and vessel conversion?

The naval architects and offshore engineers have detailed technical knowledge of marine and offshore design and construction that requires integration of fundamental mechanical, electrical and electronic engineering principles. They also design, build and operate offshore platforms, rigs and pipelines for the offshore oil and gas sector.

The marine engineers operate the shipboard systems while the vessel is at sea, making sure engines, instruments and systems work safely and efficiently on ships and submarines.

The marine and offshore engineering industry in Singapore is world-class with an international clientele. Singapore is the world leader in the conversion of Floating Production, Storage and Offloading (FPSO) and building of jack-up oilrigs (70 percent market share).

Singapore is also a major builder of semi-submersible drilling rigs, especially for operations in deep water and harsh environment. In addition, Singapore is one of the world’s premier ship repair centres and a niche player for the building of customised and specialised vessels.

Singapore also rates amongst the top three global centres for oil and gas equipment manufacturing and servicing.

Turning energy into motion to carry out specific work efficiently, that’s the major emphasis of mechanical engineers. Using principles such as heat, forces and the conservation of mass and energy they analyse physical systems and design most of the things we use in the automobiles, aircraft, heating and cooling systems and household appliances.

Versatility is the key word for mechanical engineering and you will find mechanical engineers on the move from the office to the manufacturing plant or outdoor sites, assessing new products and innovations, building prototypes, turning research ideas into technical plans and using computer aided design and modelling software, improving on production processes and planning and supervising the installation of machinery.

With their diverse training and experience, mechanical engineers are found in almost every sector of the industry from the aerospace industry to the mega production plants and from designing miniature body parts to complex oil rigs. This diversity provides the breadth for mechanical engineers to move into technical management, project management and other management positions.

Smart devices, intelligent machines and hybrid systems – these are created by integrating mechanical, electrical and computer engineering. Exploiting these disciplines together, mechatronics engineers can make devices, machines and complex systems intelligent and automated to interact with sensors, and to manipulate and control electric motors, servo-mechanisms and other electrical systems.

Industrial automation whether using robots or customised factory systems is a typical example of mechatronics. With our industry moving up the value chain, automation is constantly evolving to operate faster, more efficiently by incorporating the latest technologies.

Robotics engineers are involved in integrating science and technology to design and develop robots, which could be a consumer device such an automated vacuum cleaner to a complex production line employing multiple robots in an assembly plant. Such a device or system can be made intelligent allowing it to sense the environment, make decisions and manoeuvre itself based on a set of data in its computerised memory.

For more information on engineering careers in the building sector, please check out the BCA’s Building Careers Portal.

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